Kids Gain Weight from Soda: Average of 270 Calories a Day from Sugary Drinks, Study Says

Sep 29, 2012 05:59 PM EDT | By Bradley Brown

  • print
Soda
Fifthteen percent of five-year-old in the study were obese.

7 trillion calories each year is the average American child's consumption from liquid sugar alone, says health professor, suggesting that sweet drinks are a major factor to rising childhood obesity rates. An estimate of 12.5 million (17 per cent) of U.S. children are obese; three times as much as thirty years ago.

Like Us on Facebook

The figures sound alarming when calculated together: The estimated 270 calories that each child consumes from sugary drinks amount to over 19 billion calories a day nationwide. Dr Steven Gortmaker, Director of the Harvard School of Public Health Prevention Research Center, is pushing for an increased involvement of the government to protect children from sodas and other drinks containing large amounts of sugar.

For children, the daily recommended amount of calories ranges from 1,200 to 2,200, depending on age and gender, which means that sugary beverages account for 15 to 25 per cent on average.

'During the past 30 years, the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has increased dramatically. Compelling evidence supports a positive link between the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and the risk of obesity,' the authors of the academic paper, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Genetic Risk of Obesity, wrote.

Dr Gortmaker suggests that already allowing kids fewer options of sugary beverages at schools reduces the average calorie consumption by 45 calories. This might already be enough to turn the trend to obesity around, he says.

Read also: Childhood Obesity: Beverage Lobby Hits Back Saying Sugary Drinks Are Not Only Factor

 

© 2015 Food World News. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.
Get the Most Popular Food Stories in a Weekly Newsletter
TrendingOn The Web
Food Biz
Ronnie Fieg
Mayonnaise

FDA Tells Startup That Their Vegan Mayo Can't Be Labelled Mayonnaise

Hampton Creek Foods Inc., a San Francisco based food startup, has been slapped with a warning letter from the US Food and Drug Administration which says the company cannot call their vegan 'eggless' mayonnaise, "Just Mayo."

The Fat Jew

'The Fat Jew' Catches Heat from New York Based Food Blogger

It seems like the Internet scorn for Josh 'The Fat Jew' Ostrovsky is still coming on strong.

Food Tech
Daily Life At A Secondary School

Irradiated Food is Actually Safe to Eat

Hitting food with radiation is actually a good thing!

Airports

Airport Food Packed with 'Happy Hormones'

Airports generally trigger mixed emotions. Worry no more; one airport in London has paved the way to keep tired travellers happy. They have decided to inject some “happy hormones” on their menus according to CNN.

Real Time Analytics