The Nordic Diet, Explained

Mar 29, 2021 08:10 AM EDT | By Zyanya James (staff@foodworldnews.com)

The Nordic Diet, Explained
The Nordic Diet considers fish to be the main protein for a healthier lifestyle.
(Photo : Dana Tentis/Pexels)

Both the Mediterranean Diet and Nordic Diet are in Good Housekeeping's best diets of 2021. While the benefits of the former are widely known, the latter isn't as popular yet. However, Good Housekeeping says it the most promising, and it also shares a lot in common with the more familiar Mediterranean Diet.

The Mediterranean Diet is inspired by the lifestyles of the Greeks, Spaniards, French, and Italians. It's focused on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, olive oil, and lean meats. On the other hand, the Nordic Diet is the product of Denmark, Finland, and Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Like the Mediterranean Diet, the Nordic Diet is heavy on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fish. Both diets also include low-fat dairy products, are low in added sugars, and avoid processed foods.

According to Very Well Fit, the main difference between the two is that the Mediterranean Diet was developed from a traditional way of eating, and the Nordic Diet was deliberately created by a group of experts to improve public health in Copenhagen. Another small difference is that the Mediterranean Diet relies on olive oil, while the Nordic Diet promotes canola oil.

ALSO READ: Starting a Mediterranean Diet? Here Are the Foods You Need

What To Eat in a Nordic Diet

Greatist has compiled this list of foods that are typically found in the Nordic Diet.

Canola oil

Nuts and seeds

Low-fat dairy

Whole grains - oats, barley, rye, brown rice, quinoa, whole grain pasta, whole grain bread

Legumes - lentils, chickpeas, peas, beans

Fruits - strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, apples, pears, grapefruit, oranges, bananas, pineapple

Veggies - spinach, arugula, collard greens, kale, potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets, turnips, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, bell peppers

Fish - salmon, herring, mackerel, cod, haddock, sea bass, branzino, and other seafood

Lean meats - chicken, turkey, lean cuts of venison and lamb

Benefits of the Nordic Diet

Like the Mediterranean Diet, the Nordic Diet is great for long-term weight loss. It also features anti-inflammatory foods. Many chronic conditions are associated with inflammation, and Greatist mentions that studies have shown that targeting inflammation can lower the risk of acne, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. The Nordic Diet is also beneficial to heart health.

What's For Dinner?

All Recipes' Grilled Salmon Steaks with Savory Blueberry Sauce

Ingredients:

½ cup chicken stock

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

¼ cup orange juice

1 teaspoon honey

1 tablespoon cornstarch

¼ cup chicken stock

1 cup fresh blueberries

2 teaspoons chopped fresh chives

4 (6-ounce) salmon steaks

2 tablespoons olive oil

salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Step 1

Pour 1/2 cup chicken stock, vinegar, orange juice, and honey into a saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium. Dissolve cornstarch in 1/4 cup of chicken stock and add into the simmering sauce. Cook and stir for one to two minutes until the sauce thickens and turns clear. Stir in the blueberries and chives and keep warm over low heat.

Step 2

Preheat grill to medium high-heat.

Step 3

Brush salmon with oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill for three to four minutes per side or until the fish flakes easily with a fork. Serve with blueberry sauce.

READ MORE: Top 10 New Vegan Food Products of 2021 (So Far!)

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