Disney to Stop Some Junk-food Ads on Kids' TV, Websites

Jun 05, 2012 10:20 AM EDT

  • print
Disney Balloons
Mickey and Minnie Mouse balloons at Disney Land (Photo : Flickr)

Walt Disney Co, owner of the ABC broadcast network and a suite of cable channels, will stop accepting some junk-food ads on TV programs, radio shows and websites aimed at children, according to sources with knowledge of the plan.

Like Us on Facebook

Disney Chief Executive Bob Iger and first lady Michelle Obama plan to make an announcement on Tuesday in Washington, the sources said.

The United States faces an obesity epidemic. Nearly one-third of U.S. children are overweight or obese, and a 2006 Institute of Medicine report said junk food marketing contributed to childhood obesity.

The Disney move follows New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's announcement last week of a plan to ban sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces (about half a liter) in most restaurants, theaters, delis and vending carts throughout the city.

The ban, also aimed at fighting obesity, would affect drinks equivalent to what McDonald's Corp calls small and has incensed food and beverage makers, many of which have agreed to voluntary nutritional measures.

Disney plans to cut advertising during children's programming on its networks such as ABC and Disney XD or its kid-focused websites for foods that fail to meet minimum nutrition requirements, the sources said.

A Disney spokeswoman declined to comment on Tuesday's announcement.

The media and entertainment conglomerate introduced voluntary guidelines in 2006 that prohibited licensing of Mickey Mouse and other Disney characters for foods that fail to meet minimum nutrition the requirements.

The guidelines set limits on the amount of calories, fat and added sugar for main and side dishes and snacks.

Last year, top U.S. food and drink makers including Kraft Foods, Coca-Cola and Kellogg Co agreed to voluntary nutrition criteria for products advertised to children.

Copyright 2015 Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.
Get the Most Popular Food Stories in a Weekly Newsletter
TrendingOn The Web
Food Biz
McDonald's Reports Poor Quarterly Earnings

Hepatitis A Vaccinations Cost $100,000 After New York McDonald’s Exposure

About 3,000 people have received Hepatits A vaccine after New York McDonald's scare. The total cost of the case led to $100,000.

The FDA Focuses On Florida And Mexico In Tomato Salmonella Investigation

Food Poisoning Cases - Time for More Criminal Prosecutions?

Several food poisoning and related outbreaks have been popping up in the U.S. And while a lot of people are getting ill, public health investigators, lawyers and businesses have been discussing criminal sanctions for those in charge and connected with the outbreaks.


'Skunk-Like' Cannabis Affects Communication Between Brain Hemispheres

Dr Dazzan said: 'There is an urgent need to educate health professionals, the public and policymakers about the risks involved with cannabis use.'

Food Tech
Soylent Meal Substitute

Soylent Liquid Food: Will This be the Future of Food?

Soylent has been popular in Silicon Valley and has been around for some time. It has found its way to a niche group that enjoys easy living sans the hassle of preparing and cooking food.

Herbal Supplements

Supplements that can Boost Immunity for Better Health

If you feel as though your immune system or overall health needs some support or if you feel a cold or illness coming on, these six supplements do show benefits. When using supplements to support your immune system, you need to answer two important questions: Do you need that supplement? And is your supplement the highest possible quality?

Fighting Obesity: How much should your plate contain?

Fighting Obesity One Plate at a Time: How Much Should You Have on Your Plate?

The battle against obesity can be slightly daunting, but knowing the appropriate plate sizes can make a difference.

Real Time Analytics