A 'bran' new way to preserve healthy food with natural ingredients

Feb 06, 2019 06:53 PM EST | By Staff Reporter

Close
Rye (IMAGE)
The various stages of processing rye, from berries to alkylresorcinols (top left to bottom right): rye berries, rye chops (coarsely ground rye berries), rye bran, and alkylresorcinols (extracted and purified from rye bran).
(Photo : Ben Chrisfield)

A natural antioxidant found in grain bran could preserve food longer and replace synthetic antioxidants currently used by the food industry, according to researchers at Penn State.

"Currently, there's a big push within the food industry to replace synthetic ingredients with natural alternatives, and this is being driven by consumers," said Andrew S. Elder, doctoral candidate in food science. "Consumers want clean labels -- they want synthetic chemical-sounding ingredients removed because of the fact that they don't recognize them, and that some of them (the ingredients) have purported toxicity."

The Penn State researchers studied a class of compounds called alkylresorcinols (AR). Plants such as wheat, rye and barley produce ARs naturally to prevent mold, bacteria and other organisms from growing on the grain kernels. The researchers wondered if ARs could also preserve food in the same way from a chemical standpoint.

Along with using more natural ingredients, the food industry is also supplementing more foods with healthy oils rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Adding these healthy oils to foods that normally would not contain them could boost the health benefits of these foods to consumers. However, omega-3 rich oils have a shorter shelf life, which could cause these foods to spoil more rapidly.

"Most people consume omega-3s from marine sources," said Elder. "As they break down, they can make the product smell and taste fishy. Consumers then throw these products out and don't buy them again, and this results in an economic loss."

Antioxidants are compounds that slow the rate at which omega-3 fatty acids degrade, preserving their health benefits and preventing food from spoiling as quickly. While consumers demand more natural ingredients, the food industry has struggled to find natural antioxidants that are as effective as synthetic ones.

"There are not many natural alternatives for synthetic antioxidants," said Elder. "Our work is focused on identifying new natural antioxidants to extend the shelf life of food and meet consumer demands."

ARs have health benefits for humans as well and can help protect against cancer, according to a review published in European Food Research and Technology, making them ideal natural additives. ARs also come from the bran layer of cereal plants, which the food industry usually discards or uses for animal feed.

"Bran is often a waste stream," said Elder. "We're taking something that's usually discarded in a waste stream and turning it into something useful."

The team developed a technique to extract and purify ARs from rye bran, then studied how well ARs were able to preserve omega-3-rich oils in emulsions, where two fluids do not fully mix -- for example, vinegar and oil. The researchers chose to study AR action in emulsions because most people consume oils as emulsions, such as salad dressings. The researchers reported their findings online in Food Chemistry, and the study will be published in the January print edition.

The researchers found that ARs did act as antioxidants in an emulsion, preventing omega-3 oils from spoiling as rapidly as they did in emulsions with no antioxidants added. Then, they compared ARs to two antioxidants widely used by the food industry -- alpha-tocopherol or Vitamin E, a natural antioxidant; and butylated hydroxytoluene, a synthetic antioxidant. However, ARs were not as effective as either the natural or the synthetic antioxidant.

Although the ARs did not work as well as other antioxidants in this round of experiments, the researchers noted that their AR extracts were not completely pure, which could have reduced the effectiveness of the ARs. Also, the researchers used a blend of different ARs that had different molecular structures. Future work looking at different types of ARs will reveal whether an individual AR type is more or less effective than conventionally-used antioxidants.

"We're trying to identify natural antioxidants that are consumer-friendly, safe and effective," said Elder. "We hope that one day this work will lead to ARs being available on the market and provide more options for the food industry to use."

© 2018 Food World News. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS

Get the Most Popular Food Stories in a Weekly Newsletter
Food Biz
Soup Gets Its Time In The Sun With These Summer Spins

Soup Gets Its Time In The Sun With These Summer Spins

Soups are a classic choice for warming up on a cold winter's night. We don't often appreciate its value as summer fare, though. However, there's actually some fantastic soups perfect for the lighter, warmer season.

12 Creative Spins That Give Fries A Delicious Upgrade

12 Creative Spins That Give Fries A Delicious Upgrade

Most people love an order of fries, but how they enjoy those fries does indeed vary. Whether skinny or thick, spicy or curly or covered in truffle salt or a mix of herbs, it's a sure hit at any dinner table. Even the most classic of fun favorites though can be improved upon and some spots around the country are doing exciting things with their fries!

Rosé Wine: Is Oak-Aged Rosé Wine Gilding the Lily?

Rosé Wine: Is Oak-Aged Rosé Wine Gilding the Lily?

Rosé wine is made in almost every region in the world, from many different grape varieties. And rose-colored wine is produced in a sweet, dry, sparkling, and even fortified style. Yet the classic style of dry rosé wine from Provence sets the trend that many other wine-producing regions around the world want to emulate.

Food Tech
Pastry Chef Dominique Ansel Celebrates 15 Years In NYC With A Sweet Tribute To The City

Pastry Chef Dominique Ansel Celebrates 15 Years In NYC With A Sweet Tribute To The City

Dominique Ansel moved from Paris to New York City to work at Daniel Boulud's French flagship Daniel as the executive pastry chef, a position he held for 6 years. Fast forward 15 years later, and Ansel has become a household name after the invention of a certain croissant-donut hybrid, and his namesake bakery has expanded beyond SoHo to include branches around the world.

This Is Where The Piña Colada Was Born

This Is Where The Piña Colada Was Born

As if you ever really need an excuse to order a piña colada, today is National Piña Colada Day, so go ahead and order that creamy, sweet, cocktail-meets-dessert libation that is best served on a sunny, tropical beach somewhere exotic.

Prague Should Be Your Next Foodie Vacation Destination

Prague Should Be Your Next Foodie Vacation Destination

The cold brisk wind whips through the streets on an early spring evening in Prague. As temperatures hover around freezing, only one dish warms the soul this evening. Upon opening the door to Krčma the smell of comfort greets us like warm blanket-braised meat, baking spices, simmering herbs, and fried potatoes.

Real Time Analytics